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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 6:27 pm Reply with quote

Hello everyone, I am new to peafowl. I've always wanted some since the first time I met one in person. It was love at first sight.

I recently acquired a pair of Java green peafowl breeders. I was so excited and immediately brought them home and set them up to the best of my ability. Since then, I've noticed I may be off to a bad start. After I got them home and had a good look over them, I started realizing little things that make me believe I may have a "fixer-upper" pair that was less than thriving. I realize that peafowl are hardy critters, but let me describe some of my concerns.

Concern number 1: Both birds seem underweight. I don't know what the normal peafowl weighs or their plumbness, because these were the first I've ever handled personally. Their breast bone was protruding pretty fiercly and at first I shrugged it off thinking that it was normal for peafowl to be bony critters, but I've read a few topics and an experienced peafowl owner complaining about receiving birds with a protruding breast bone and called them emaciated.

To aid in concern number one, I've given them Ivomec in their water and have added a little bit of puppy chow to boost the protein.

Concern number 2: The peacock has what looks to be a bumble foot. On one foot where his toes meet, is swollen. It looks to be an old injury, when I brought him home, I searched for an open wound on his foot and couldn't find any.

Does bumble foot ever heal completely to the point the foot is back to the way it was?

To aid in concern number 2, I have both birds in a large horse stall with a good amount of shavings and no roost(for fear of making a possible bumble foot worse).

Concern number 3 + the BIGGEST concern: The peahen seems to be in distress today. I walked out there and sat in the stall just to observe them. She is standing with her wings drooping unevenly and her tail pushed into the ground. A possible egg-bound?!? The way she stands seems unnatural, where the peacock is streamline and horizontal to the ground, she is standing more verticle with her neck in a crook and her wings drooping. I am getting ready to catch her up and feel for any bound eggs or a stuffed crop(just a general over look).

UPDATE: I just went out and felt on the peahen, I couldn't find anything that would point to an eggbound. SHE SKINNY THOUGH! I never realized how skinny until now. Her breast bone protrudes at least 3-4 inches all the way down between her legs. I gave her some Tylan 50, to ward off any infection or illness she may have. I am feeding them a mix of laying pellets and puppy chow, they really like the puppy chow they'll picked it out of the laying pellets and it's pretty much gone.

Is catfood better for them, or is puppy chow okay? Should I be feeding them chick starter crumbles instead of laying pellets? Any other tips to bring them up to weight? Confused

I wanted to post this before I left to go tend to them and hope that someone with more experience than I would be able to help. These are my first, and I realize I may have made a mistake by buying an unhealthy pair, but they are here now and I need help, or at least some comforting words for a worried, paranoid, new peafowl owner!

Thanks everyone for reading,
-Kim


Last edited by Wolf-Kim on Wed May 13, 2009 7:29 pm; edited 3 times in total
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DMFarms
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Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 183
Location: Winona Texas
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:16 pm Reply with quote

Kim
Bumble foot could be cause by several things. It could be a vitamin A deficiency or even there perch conditions. It need to be treated with a antibiotic. Sound like they have worms
really bad putting the ivomec in the water want help much they need to be caught and wormed. If you can find some safe guard or valbazen put one cc down there throat hopefully you are not to late and the worms has not cause to much damage. If you just got these birds sound like the breeder was not taking care of them they should have feed at all times.
Doug
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PeaJ



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 5
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:24 pm Reply with quote

Hi Kim,
The puppy chow is ok, but since they are already underweight, dry cat food may be a better choice for it's higher protein along with game bird food. Sounds like you have a major worm issue. You need to get wormer in them. If by mouth it may work better to take food and water away at night and worm them in the am. I am no expert, newbie myself. Hopefully someone can give you better answers.

Rhonda
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:26 pm Reply with quote

Thanks Doug. Any idea where I can find these dewormers? Are they intended for other livestock? Are they a paste or an injectable?

Just trying to figure out where and what to look for.

-Kim
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:42 pm Reply with quote

Thanks Rhonda!

I'll switch them to catfood in the morning. I pick up their food at night to avoid feeding the rodents.

I appreciate all the help. Keep the advice coming!
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JenniferB
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Joined: 19 Apr 2008
Posts: 378
Location: Up North in Clearbrook, MN
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:45 pm Reply with quote

Hello and welcome to the world of peafowl! It does sound like you got birds that haven't been taken care of, but you sound like their savior! You will love them.

I don't know much about worm treatment, but there are plenty here who do. There are many topics on it in this health forum.

For putting weight on them, I believe cat food has higher protein than dog but each is good. Probably kitten or puppy food would have even more. Check the labels for percentages. Also, things like sunflower seeds, game bird food - maybe even game bird starter instead of grower. That is for chick raising instead of maintenance, it may have higher levels of the good stuff that will put weight on them faster. It wont hurt them to feed it to them until they gain weight. I even feed my birds treats a few times a week, maybe some things that are high in fat. French fries they love! Fruits and veggies are also very good for them and a favorite for my birds.

As for the feet. Where did they come from? A cold environment? I have seen feet that have been frozen. What happens is the tip of the toe can fall off and get rounded and bulbous and the rest of the length of the toes or even the whole foot can look very round and swollen.

What your hen is doing just sounds like she will be laying an egg soon. Drooping wings is the sign and the tail. My hens walk around looking like that most of breeding season. Plus I am sure if they are that undernourished, she doesn't feel the greatest.

I am sure you will get tons of advice here. Everyone is wonderful. It sure sounds like you are taking excellent steps in the right direction, they will be fine.

Keep us informed on how they are doing.

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Jennifer
Clearbrook, MN


Last edited by JenniferB on Fri May 08, 2009 8:51 pm; edited 2 times in total
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DMFarms
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Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 183
Location: Winona Texas
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:46 pm Reply with quote

Kim these are cattle and sheep wormer it is a liquid wormer safe -guard and panacur is the same thing. Most feed stores carry these wormers I order most of my meds from Jeffers but you need some now if you can't find these local give them around 1/2 to 3/4cc of the ivomec down there throat. When giving them liquid meds by mouth make sure you get it past there wind pipe.
Doug
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 8:56 pm Reply with quote

Okay, I will run up to the local TSC and pick up some of those wormers. I'll also look for some gamebird starter to add in instead of laying pellets. I just picked up their food, and they pecked all around the pellets and ate the puppy chow. Glad they have an appetite.

I'm glad that the hen isn't displaying signs of being egg-bound. That's the last thing I need on my plate!

As for environment, I bought them here in NC. It doesn't seem like frostbite. When I catch him tomorrow to deworm him, I will take a closer look and get some pics. They were being kept in 6'X6' gazebo style pens with tin roofs and no flooring and no solid walls. Just a dirt floor, no roosts.

Someone on another forum suggested Blackhead, which brings horror to mind, but they suggested I pick up some meds for it. What do you guys think? I don't mind picking up the meds, but deworming and antibiotics as well as a huge boost in protein seems like a lot by itself to be hitting them in one week. I would hate to throw Blackhead meds on that and overwhelm them. What do you think?

Is there a tutorial somewhere on how to get the dewormer past their windpipe? I'm getting ready to google it, but I wanted to go ahead and ask here.

Thanks a ton everyone, I appreciate it so much I can't describe it. I hate that they turned out to be in such bad shape.


Last edited by Wolf-Kim on Wed May 13, 2009 7:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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DMFarms
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Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 183
Location: Winona Texas
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 9:07 pm Reply with quote

Kim I don't think it blackhead I think it is worms if you have a vet you can take a stool sample to he can tell. I would hold of on the antibiotic till you get them back healthy.
Doug
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 9:22 pm Reply with quote

Thanks everyone so, so much! You have really put me at ease. I know that they aren't out of the woods, but at least I know what I am dealing with and how to go about it.

-Kim
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featherhead
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Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 869
Location: Louisville KY
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 9:31 pm Reply with quote

Hi Kim

Dog and cat foods are good supplements. Dog foods typically average from 21%-24% protein. Cat foods run between 29%-36% protein, depending on the formula. Plus, they like the taste and it sounds like your pair needs to eat. Good luck, and keep us posted, okay?

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Jeanna
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Joined: 06 Nov 2007
Posts: 298
Location: Indiana
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 12:59 am Reply with quote

Hello Kim,

Sounds like you are getting a lot of good advice. The forum here is great help, especially to newcomers or newbies. (wish it was here when I started).

Do not know if you have vet in your area you know or trust. Or if he has any experience with birds. But a small animal vet can examine a stool sample and tell you if your birds have worms (and I would bet they are loaded) and he could also get you started right away with panacur. I would do this immediately. The vet could also show you how to dose them. Which is like Doug said putting it down their throat instead of putting it in the water.

Baytril is a great antibiotic for birds and would be good for bumble foot which is a bacterial infection that has started in some type of a wound on the foot. A small cut, or even a bruise can become infected. And yes a vitamin A deficiency can increase the risk some say.
And most of the time it is associated with dirty, droppings accumulated living quarters that the birds are living in. Staph, e coli, and pseudomonas are usually the culprit bacterium.

Bumblefoot can also kill, but much slower than worms. Sometimes multiple antibiotics have to be used for bumblefoot. And I have seen where the hard area (abcessed area that gets hard as a rock has to be cut out).

I would worm, then start antibiotics for the bumblefoot.

A shame you have to start out this way, sounds like what happened to me when I started. Got birds full of worms, and some died before I knew what I was dealing with. It can really be heartbreaking.

But I would call your vet and try that first. May cost a little more, but would be much quicker. You would know exactly what you are dealing with parasite wise, you would have the proper meds from the vet, and he could give you the dose and show you how to dose.

Wish you the best of luck.

Jeanna
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 11:54 am Reply with quote

UPDATE:

So today we caught each bird and gave them each dewormer by mouth.

I tried to weigh them, but our scale is a pain in the tailfeathers and wouldn't work for us outside. You know how scared peafowl are, so the birds weren't coming inside. Wink

We did the hen first, she went okay then she was looked over for mites which I didn't find anything(good thing ). Back into the stall with fresh food and water.

Next came the peacock, a little harder to catch, but we got him. He went even better with the dewormer, he actually relaxed his mouth which helped so much more. I wish I could say that was it for him, but we had a foot issue to deal with. Wiped his foot down with warm water and soap. Took some pictures and then took a razor and some tweezers to remove not one but two absessed plugs from his foot. Puss and blood every, my fiance(the helper, who has extremely sensitive feet himself) winced and commented to the bird the whole time I was working. "Poor guy, that is going to feel so much better in a few days without those two hard things in his foot".

After this, we rubbed triple antibiotic cream on his foot and bandaged it up with gauze and tape and put him back in the stall. While I was messing with his feet and feeling/looking for plugs, I noticed he has SEVERAL frostbitten toes. They are dead, flattened, stiff, and black. They look(and feel) like they would snap off if I touched them or tried to flex them)

I will be going and buying some Iodine and bandages today. That way I can use a syringe and flush the wound tomorrow when I exchange his bandages. I had a horse get an absess before and the vet had us do a wet boot, which is where you mix water, iodine, and epson salt and soak the animals foot in it. I think I may do the same with the bird to help draw out the extra puss and blood.

I forgot to get pics of the foot after I pulled the plugs, I was in a hurry to get him back in his stall so he could cool down and relax. I'll get pics tonight of the foot after I pulled the plugs and have the Iodine flush on hand.

**adding pics now**


Last edited by Wolf-Kim on Wed May 13, 2009 7:34 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 12:28 pm Reply with quote

First pictures of the hen:


(I think her color will improve with her health)


Her breast bone and a picture of her weight issue. The cock is in the same condition.




Next pictures are of the peacock's feet. Combination of bumblefoot and frostbite. Crying or Very sad





Pictures of them in the stall after deworming and foot surgery, so they aren't exactly feeling great and pleased with me Rolling Eyes

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Wolf-Kim



Joined: 08 May 2009
Posts: 16
Location: North Carolina
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 1:03 pm Reply with quote

One more thing.. Since I am new to peafowl, I asked the breeder what they were, and they said Java greens...

I've been going through the UPA gallery, and the colors don't quite seem to match up. Could it be that their colors are affected because they are malnourished, or are they not Java greens?

I wanted to say thanks again everyone
-Kim


Last edited by Wolf-Kim on Wed May 13, 2009 7:36 pm; edited 1 time in total
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