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  Lots of Pecking on day 19 and 20?
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  Post new topic   Reply to topic The United Peafowl Association - www.peafowl.org Forum Index » Incubation, Hatching, and Peachick care     
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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:44 pm Reply with quote

Hi I haven't found anyone who really knows what is going on with this egg I have in the incubator. For sure it is on day 20 of incubation today. I am planning on going in lockdown on day 24 (Monday). Since last night I can hear the chick pecking. I don't see any holes in the egg but the chick is pecking inside the egg and the egg isn't wiggling but it does move very slightly to where it is hardly noticeable.

I am worried because it is still a bit early for all that pecking and I just want to make sure the peachick doesn't tire itself out before it is really time to hatch. Candling the egg shows that the air cell is not yet the right size so I don't understand why I hear so much pecking.

I just want to know if I should just leave it alone and keep turning it until day 24 as planned and then stop turning and add extra water or would it be a good idea and not hurt to go ahead and add more water and stop turning? I don't want to hurt the peachick or anything this is a very special egg.

Edited to add that the temp is just at about 100 deg F and the humidity I am not sure about because I use a styrofoam incubator and just follow the directions for filling one tray for most of the incubation and both trays for the final days.
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burdgurl
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:47 pm Reply with quote

MinxFox wrote:
Hi I haven't found anyone who really knows what is going on with this egg I have in the incubator. For sure it is on day 20 of incubation today. I am planning on going in lockdown on day 24 (Monday). Since last night I can hear the chick pecking. I don't see any holes in the egg but the chick is pecking inside the egg and the egg isn't wiggling but it does move very slightly to where it is hardly noticeable.

I am worried because it is still a bit early for all that pecking and I just want to make sure the peachick doesn't tire itself out before it is really time to hatch. Candling the egg shows that the air cell is not yet the right size so I don't understand why I hear so much pecking.

I just want to know if I should just leave it alone and keep turning it until day 24 as planned and then stop turning and add extra water or would it be a good idea and not hurt to go ahead and add more water and stop turning? I don't want to hurt the peachick or anything this is a very special egg.

Edited to add that the temp is just at about 100 deg F and the humidity I am not sure about because I use a styrofoam incubator and just follow the directions for filling one tray for most of the incubation and both trays for the final days.


It sounds like it's fine, it prob. will hatch on day 26-27, internal pip prob. will be made around day 24-25 .
I always stop turning once the internal pip has been made and don't believe in lockdown, those chicks in the eggs could actually use small short burst of additional air , especially in the last few days. IE: open your incubator door for about 15 -30 seconds at a time several times a day , especially in the last few days.
This helps to also get the bad air that the eggs put off ( carbon dioxide ) out of the incubator and replaced with good fresh air, in addition to those pores in the shell taking in additional air that the chicks need so badly .
Just keep as your doing and don't change anything until you see that the internal pip has been made.
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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:37 pm Reply with quote

Okay thank you! I am just very axious and worried about anything going wrong so I wil just keep doing what I am doing until probably Monday when I will add more water and stop turning.Last night I realized I needed to calm down and just let the chick do its thing.
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D C T
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 7:53 pm Reply with quote

Back in 1992 I picked up Twister's first egg as soon as I saw it--while it was still very
warm and a bit moist. As soon as it was dry I put identifying mark on it and carried it to
a waiting incubating chicken. This first egg from a special rescued pet was small but
perfect in shape and color. That egg was pipped on day 24 even though the chickens had
driven setting hen from nest and chilled the eggs. In fact the peachick in Twister's number
two egg died halfway through incubation. I waited one full day from when I found that pip
on egg number one and very carefully helped Firstborn out. I suspect that the chilling at
mid incubation nearly killed her but she was as determined to survive as her mother was.
It was the smallness of the egg that made her incubation period shorter. Firstborn was as
"limp as a wet dish rag" as my long departed grandmother would have said. I rubbed her
very gently with a towel and even used a hair dryer set on LOW just a little bit. She had to
be treated for straddle legs. Firstborn lived 21 years.
--------
Before I help a peachick out of egg I candle and look for visible blood vessels around the
airspace which warn me that the peachick is not ready to come out. Please note: on
white peachicks or peachicks that are pale color those blood vessels will always show
more plainly that on blue, green or any other breed that has darker peachick.
-------
If a peachick is "head between the legs" malposition I must break egg two days before it
is due to hatch even if I do see blood vessels. If I do the rescue procedure there is a
50% chance of saving its life. If not rescued there is a 100% chance that I will never be
able to take first breath.
........and how do I know if I need to perform the rescue??? --"experience is what I learned
the hard way"...but there is one clue the only movement you can see with candler if
peachick is not able to move head locked between legs -- is a tiny bit of motion at the
base of the neck (at large end of egg) In the very rare exception when tail is at big end
of egg the peachick's eggyolk is probably hanging out and I have never seen one like
that live.

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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2014 8:24 pm Reply with quote

This egg is from Doug. It is a Burmese green egg that is why I am super anxious about it and I want to make sure it is okay. I have been wanting a green peafowl for several years now and Doug sent me two eggs but the second one got a detached air sack from shipping so this is the only one of the two that has made it. If it hatches I worked out from a local breeder that I have been selling eggs to that he will give me a young peachick to be friends with the newly hatched chick. I have heard of those stories of imprinted greens getting aggressive as adults so I don't want to chance anything. I have an imprinted peacock, Peep, who doesn't attack me but tries to mate with my feet.

I don't hear peeping or scratching so I guess it is just being very lively. Sunday or Monday I will put it in lockdown. I have helped peachicks out before without any of them dying after being helped out, but I really don't like helping them out if I can avoid it so I am really praying that this chick is very strong and won't need any help. The closer it gets to hatching the more nervous I always get. Rolling Eyes

I candled it last night and didn't see anything as far as the chick in the air cell or anything so I don't think it is hatching early.
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D C T
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 7:13 am Reply with quote

Last night I started another reply to your post and both times a distant thunderstorm made
the electricity flicker so that my computer went dark just long enough to erase my post computer
Perhaps by this morning there is some progress. If not, can you take a photo of that egg
while candling it? I know that you are handy with modern gadgets. Back in the Dark Ages
of the last century I had a camcorder and tried to videotape eggs under a candler. My
camcorder is beyond repair and an accute cash flow problem prevents me from trying the
new technology gaah but I do have a computer that works well enough to view photos
so that I am still able to be a "friendly poultry orthopedist" for anybody that wants to ask
me a question. I would like to see a picture of your egg.

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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2014 11:08 pm Reply with quote

Sorry about that DCT, I was busy today but anyways it is far too late for the peachick. Just about all 22 days I have been incubating a bad egg and today it broke.


The egg got a small hole in it where some stinky stuff came out. The whole thing was full of grey liquid and I found what I think was the chick, it was very very small. It was dead most of the incubation process that is for sure. It was one of the two Burmese eggs that Doug sent me and the other egg was clear early on so this was the final one. I think my wish for having my first green peafowl clouded my judgment and made me believe that I heard tapping when I think it was just my incubator making nose. It was definitely a bad egg though and now I am pretty bummed. Sad I definitely would like to thank Doug of DM Farms though for sending me the eggs. I saw a photo of the Burmese peacock the eggs are from. He is very beautiful and I was lucky to get to try my hand at incubating the eggs.
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D C T
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2014 6:32 am Reply with quote

Minx Fox, I am sorry that your peachick died in early stage of development. In 1989 I had
some eggs that were sent by US Post Office from Pennsylvania to Georgia and not even
one of them ever started an embryo. One egg arrived precracked.
--------------
OK, now I have some candling advice for you. Insist on absolute silence by holding your
breath and DO NOT blink.....eyelids can be noisy in the candling closit :wow

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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2014 1:10 pm Reply with quote

Haha the problem was just my incubator making noise making me think it was the egg tapping.

Do you have any special tips for hatching shipped peafowl eggs?

The first time I ever got shipped peafowl eggs I got 5 of them a few years ago and none really developed or developed for long and then of course this time it was two eggs and they didn't work out. Also for both cases the eggs were packaged very well so I don't see it being an issue in the packing.

The only eggs I have ever hatched where eggs from my own birds.
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D C T
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2014 3:35 pm Reply with quote

MinxFox wrote:
Do you have any special tips for hatching shipped peafowl eggs? .

Some people think that a shipped egg needs to sit a day or two to settle from the
vibrations of shipping but I VERY strongly disagree. Because the longer time between when
the egg is laid and the incubation begins the greater the chance that the embryo will die.
The only egg that came in Mail and lived to be a peacock was a black shoulder named
Midnight the Killer Peacock in 1989 from an address in this state (Georgia) He was one of
three well wrapped eggs. One did not form an embryo and the other was fizzy rotten.
He was incubated most of the way by a brown silkie hen who was displaced by a white
silkie just before Midnight hatched. The brand new BS peachick was almost as white as
snow so that Frostina easily bonded with him. Back then I did not know any better than
to let chickens raise peachicks. Anyhow when Midnight was eight weeks old her "son"
was becoming colorful and towered over his "mother's" head. So Frostina quietly sneaked
away to her own family while Midnight got to meet some juveniles of his own species.
-------
A few years ago I had an oversupply of peahen eggs and tried an experiment with a
friend in Florida. I got a two inch thick sheet of styrofoam and used a hole saw to cut
some egg size holes in it with sponge cushion above and below it. I packed eggs in this
and put it in a box which I carried to post office and shipped by Express Mail (money back
gaurantee of delivery in one day)---well, I got my money back Confused because they went to
wrong address first but did get there. Was told that one peachick "almost" hatched. Crying or Very sad
------
Right now Kid (white spalding peahen) is on her nest - perhaps setting or perhaps
trying to lay an egg. Yesterday she was there but perched in coop without adding to the
three eggs already there. If I had a good chicken (or any willing chicken) I might take
custody of those eggs. NO peafowl egg will hatch if started in my incubators.....it would
make more sense to make egg salad sandwiches Rolling Eyes There are NO peachicks here
this year and I am almost glad to not have to care for them. I have sold a few eggs but
do not have many.

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MinxFox
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2014 7:16 pm Reply with quote

I agree when I get eggs in from shipping I open the box, get them out, and put them in the incubator right away.

I know some people seem to have good luck with shipped eggs. On Backyard Chickens a few of the members are sending each other free or cheap eggs so that they can try different packing methods and hatching methods. I think some have shipped eggs that are developing but I know one lady got about 6 and none made it.

I know some people try and get started with peafowl by shipping eggs and trying to hatch them. For those people I always recommend getting local peafowl eggs or getting chicks first. Although to me the best way to start is with adult birds because I find it hard waiting for them to color out.

Hopefully Doug will get more eggs that he could sell me. If I was able to hatch even just one that would be good enough for me.

I am not hatching my own peafowl eggs this year too.
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