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  White eye genetics
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  Post new topic   Reply to topic The United Peafowl Association - www.peafowl.org Forum Index » Breeding and Genetics     
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Bigdog
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Location: McKinnon TN
PostPosted: Mon Dec 02, 2013 8:26 pm Reply with quote

I have been told that putting a silver pied or a white eye with a straight bird will produce white eyes. I have made one split 3 or 4 years ago and it did produce some white eyes but breeding it back to the straight bird have failed to produce any white eyes Also i split some this year and that combo failed to produce any white eyes(sp x straight)
Am i missing something here?


Thanks Bigdog
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Arbor



Joined: 14 Feb 2011
Posts: 58
Location: Niagara Canada
PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 8:45 pm Reply with quote

A really good white-eyed bird will receive one copy from the mother and one copy from the father (double copy white-eyed). To get this, both parents must carry the gene. When you are breeding a single copy white-eyed bird to a non-carrying bird, genetics says you should get 50% of the offspring to carry a single copy. This doesnt guarrantee it, it just says the odds are you should get some. As for the SPxstraight, if none of the offspring are showing any white-eyed characteristics, it is possible you have a loud pied bird that has a single copy of white-eyed that looks similar to a SP. In that case, only 50% could show the gene. Genetics is also not guaranteed, its basically the likely cinerio. Things do and can happen that are beyond the control or knowledge of experts.
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Bigdog
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PostPosted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 9:03 pm Reply with quote

When you are breeding a single copy white-eyed bird to a non-carrying bird, genetics says you should get 50% of the offspring to carry a single copy[color=red][/color]

Does thid mean it will be a WE or it will carry the WE gene(recessive)?

So breeding a double WE gene to a straight will produce a WE.

What about breeding both WE single copy and split to another color?

Bigdog
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Arbor



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Location: Niagara Canada
PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:34 am Reply with quote

White-eyed gene is dominant, not recessive. That means that if a bird has one copy of the gene, it should be visible (the male will only have some white eyes in the train). However, if the bird has two copies, the male should show all or nearly all white-eyes in its train.

People generally call the bird white-eyed, if it has one copy or two copies. But the best white-eyed birds have two copies.

Breeding a bird with two copies to a bird that has no copies should produce 100% offspring that carry one copy.

I'm not sure what you mean by breeding both a single copy WE bird and split to another colour. Are both birds carrying WE? Are both birds split to the other colour?

For example, an Indian Blue male split to cameo that has one copy of the white-eyed gene should produce female offspring that are cameo WE (single copy) 25% of the time.
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Bigdog
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 12:39 pm Reply with quote

White-eyed gene is dominant, not recessive. That means that if a bird has one copy of the gene, it should be visible (the male will only have some white eyes in the train). However, if the bird has two copies, the male should show all or nearly all white-eyes in its train.


OK This year i crossed a SP and Straight midnight in 2 different pens. Result was zero WE



I'm not sure what you mean by breeding both a single copy WE bird and split to another colour. Are both birds carrying WE? Are both birds split to the other colour?


A few years ago i crossed a SP and an Opal Got 2 WE birds (1 male 1 female) The past 2 years i have breed back to an opal with no white eyes. My question is if i breed the pair together will that produce a WE with 2 genes? Both will be split so i should get some opals out of them[/color]

Thanks
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Arbor



Joined: 14 Feb 2011
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Location: Niagara Canada
PostPosted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 8:03 pm Reply with quote

OK This year i crossed a SP and Straight midnight in 2 different pens. Result was zero WE

As I said, genetics is not a sure thing, this is just what should happen. There is also a chance that your SP is not SP, but in fact a loud pied bird carrying a single copy of the WE gene. Without seeing the bird, I can't make the call.

As for the birds from SPxopal, you technically should eventually get a WE bird with 2 genes. However, if one bird is carrying pied, and the other white, you could end up with white-eyed, pied, pied white-eyed or even SP in either blue or opal. There is a great deal of potential in those two birds!
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Bigdog
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 08, 2013 7:23 pm Reply with quote

Thanks for all the info
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lhROW
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:58 pm Reply with quote

Spammer!

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D C T
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Joined: 16 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 7:48 am Reply with quote

Johni wrote:
A really good white-eyed bird will receive one copy from the mother and one copy from the father (double copy white-eyed). To get this, both parents must carry the gene. When you are breeding a single copy white-eyed bird to a non-carrying bird, genetics says you should get 50% of the offspring to carry a single copy. This doesnt guarrantee it, it just says the odds are you should get some. As for the SPxstraight, if none of the offspring are showing any white-eyed characteristics, it is possible you have a loud pied bird that has a single copy of white-eyed that looks similar to a SP. In that case, only 50% could show the gene. Genetics is also not guaranteed, its basically the likely cinerio. Things do and can happen that are beyond the control or knowledge of experts. Rolling Eyes

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D C T
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2015 8:02 am Reply with quote

lhROW wrote:
Spammer!

====================
Sorry it took so long but I am the "ACCIDENTAL MODERATOR" computer
still getting used to the ability to pull "weeds" from this garden of knowlege.
But I DO ENJOY IT run

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