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  They're heeeerrrrreeeee :) peachicks 2012
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  Post new topic   Reply to topic The United Peafowl Association - www.peafowl.org Forum Index » Incubation, Hatching, and Peachick care Goto page 1, 2  Next    
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Cory



Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 36
Location: Southeast Texas
PostPosted: Fri May 04, 2012 4:37 pm Reply with quote

Yippieeeee !!!! My first clutch of peafowl eggs have hatched under a game hen - mum disappeared one week b4 hatch - but Thank GOD I had this mean ol' game hen who set them Smile

I'm definitely new to peafowl and will welcome any suggestions regarding:
- feeding
- brooding (w/,w/out game hen)
- medicated feed / gamebird crumble
- water supplements : vit/elct, wormer

Thank you on advance! These peas are sooooo cute!

Cory

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Hello kidz !!! I am new to raising peafowl, I have been around agriculture all my life and always desired to raise Peafowl. I am just moving back from the Upper East Side of NYC and am ready to get back to what I love! AGRICULTURE!
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Zenith49



Joined: 14 May 2010
Posts: 42
Location: West Park, FL
PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2012 2:48 pm Reply with quote

I also have new chicks - 4 now and another egg has pipped. I am also brand new at this. We live in the burbs and have had peas for the last few years, but never any chicks.

All my eggs have been in an incubator as my two hens were not inclined to sit at the beginning and were laying the eggs all over the place. I collected the first 5 and tried to incubate them with a heating pad. Bad idea as the eggs got overheated. I borrowed an incubator and put the rest of the eggs in it as they were laid. The hens started laying on 3/22/12, but didn't decide to sit until 4/12. They laid two more eggs after they started sitting (in the same nest).

So, altogether they laid 17 eggs. I ruined the first 5, the next two didn't hatch. Eggs 8 through 10 have hatched, egg 11 hasn't, egg 12 hatched, egg 13 hasn't , egg 14 has just pipped. Egg 15 and 16 have a few days yet and egg 17 got broken in the nest.

One of my hens lost interest and the other was taking extended breaks, so I decided to collect the remaining egg and bring it in. It was cold when I brought it in.

So, we have 4 - soon to be 5 - of the cutest critters I've seen. They seem to be doing well and have bonded with me and respond to my voice.

Is there something special I should be doing? What happens next?

Thanks for any info you have.

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Zenith49
West Park, FL
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Cory



Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 36
Location: Southeast Texas
PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2012 1:19 pm Reply with quote

heyyy Z49 Smile I am sorry for the delayed response, but these peachicks have been keeping me going as well as my other menagerie of livestock I have here!

If they are responding to you by voice, then that is awesome! You are doing perfectly fine! My little piggies only respond when I am opening up the cage to give them something to shove in their mouths! LOL - soooo - I am wondering if it is sage to give them the little crickets from the pet store ;-? I noticed that when I put my peacock and chicks he was with out to actually eat on their own, they nearly doubled in size in a matter of 2 weeks. I know the natural protein is better, but I want to make sure I am not giving them anything that will harm them.

I would suggest you keep them on the medicated chick starter (the coccidiosis treated feed) and I have actually been mixing in the game bird crumble for the added protein that the peafowl should need for proper growth.

there are a good group of folks here in the forum that have much more experience that I do as far as raising them so ask around .... follow some of my posts and you can see responses from them. I have definitely kept them off of the ground and while they have the game hen that hatched them out with them, I have included a dusting station w/ Diatemaceous Earth (fine food grade) for them to learn from her. I give a few grass clippings that I pull myself as well as boiled egg (fresh yard eggs) for added energy. They bounce off the walls in their house. LOL

I personally keep a large 250wt infrared bulb on all day with them in their house and if they get chilled at night time they have mum to crawl under and around for the warmth that they want. The infrared bulb is actually good for growth as well. Their house is pretty big at 4'5" X 6'5" X 8' and 3' off the ground. They have plenty of grow room and prior to them coming, the mature hens and my pcock all would roost in side the house with the chickens - of course I bleached it 2x's before the chicks arrived to eliminate any pests!

I am sure you will be fine and if there are any questions, you can ask me and I can help you with answers by asking others. Smile it is sometimes hard to acquire help in this forum at times.

Anyway ... Happy Peachicking LOL

Cory

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Hello kidz !!! I am new to raising peafowl, I have been around agriculture all my life and always desired to raise Peafowl. I am just moving back from the Upper East Side of NYC and am ready to get back to what I love! AGRICULTURE!
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featherhead
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Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 869
Location: Louisville KY
PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2012 6:48 pm Reply with quote

Hi Zenith & Cory
After trial and error, trying to go "natural" and all phases in between, there are a lot of things about chick-rearing that I've learned thru experience. Ignorance cost several chicks' lives, which was completely unnecessary. Not that I'm an old pro or anything, but these are some of the things I learned:
1) Feed medicated chick feed. It contains amprolium to help ward off coccidiosis, which is fatal to the wee ones. Babies don't have much of an immune system until they're about 4 months old.
2) During the first 5 days, if the babies go off their feed, moisten it and add a crumbled hard-boiled chicken egg YOLK. Feed chick starter for the first 4 months, then gradually wean them to the adult feed, pellets or crumble.
3) Keep peachicks off the ground until they are 4 months old. Around this time, their immune system will become fully developed and they can handle most of the natural germs and bacteria they are likely to ingest. Heat is essential until this time.
4) At 8 weeks, you can begin intruducing some fruit and veggie. Wash it thoroughly! My peas gobble organic kale and love all melons, raisins, wild strawberry, clover and young dandelion leaves. Grapes are their favorite fruit; cut them in half for the kids.
5) I began worming my chicks at 4 weeks. Many people start at 2 weeks.
6) Please ask questions if you get confused, scared or have sick babies. There are lots of experienced people here, willing to help. Drag out your UPA directory and call someone if it's urgent. We love to help when we can because we love our birds.

Zenith, your babies are ADORABLE. Thank you so much for posting the photo!

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Zenith49



Joined: 14 May 2010
Posts: 42
Location: West Park, FL
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 9:15 am Reply with quote

featherhead wrote:

Zenith, your babies are ADORABLE. Thank you so much for posting the photo!


Thank you so much, Featherhead. Your reply really answers some basic questions I've had about my happy chicks. Not all went well, unfortunately. Number 5 pipped and took 12 hours to hatch. Poor baby never really recovered from the ordeal. I think I should have helped him out, but I didn't. Number 6 though, pipped and hatched while number 5 was struggling. So, now we have 5 seemingly healthy babies. I'm feeding them Purina start and grow and their water is sav-a-chick which is difficult as each packet makes a gallon and they say to make a new gallon everyday. I broke the packet in 7 1 gram mini-packets which makes 18 oz and I keep what I don't use immediately in the fridge. Is this ok?

The last chick seems to have a problem with his right wing. The ill-fated chick had the same problem. It doesn't seem to fold against his body quite right and I haven't seen him try to fly like the others do. That was a real surprise - seeing how they could almost fly within days of hatching. He does flap around like the rest. Anyway there is a gap between the last two or three feathers on the wingtip and the rest of the wing. All the rest of the chicks and little guys left wing, all fold evenly against their bodies, but not this. Do you think this is cause for concern?

How big of a space do these babies need while they're growing up. I can see they are going to outgrow the space they are currently in pretty quickly. We are keeping them inside for now and I forsee doing that for at least several more weeks. It's kinda difficult for us as we have 13 indoor cats. Mostly we keep the chicks in the laundry room and keep the cats out. But occasionally the door is open when only two cats are around. I'm amazed that the cats haven't been attracted by the sound and movement, but so far, they have ignored the babies. I guess that is was TV does to cats as they are used to noise and movement coming from a box that doesn't actually contain any critters.

We have a 6'x6'x10' chain link dog kennel that the adults come back to when they feed or maybe spend the night. That seems a little crowded for three adults including one male, although they don't seem to have a problem being in there. We have another kennel we can assemble of the same size, but I'd like to cover it with chicken wire or something finer to keep the other birds and squirrels out. We have the fattest squirrels in the neighborhood eating all the good stuff we feed the peas. Does this seems suitable to you for once they are outdoors and on the ground?

Do they groom each other? I have been watching them peck at each other and now they seem to be grooming each other's faces. The peckee doesn't seem to mind. I am amazed at how lively and curious and trusting they are. It is truly a delight to have them here.

Here is a pic of one of the chicks. I find if very difficult to tell them apart as they all seem to look alike. Their personalities are emerging, though.

Thanks so much for your advice and help.
Z

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Zenith49
West Park, FL
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Cory



Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 36
Location: Southeast Texas
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 10:24 am Reply with quote

I need help uploading pics Smile. Can someone give a little instruction Confused
THANX Smile)

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Hello kidz !!! I am new to raising peafowl, I have been around agriculture all my life and always desired to raise Peafowl. I am just moving back from the Upper East Side of NYC and am ready to get back to what I love! AGRICULTURE!
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Zenith49



Joined: 14 May 2010
Posts: 42
Location: West Park, FL
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 1:56 pm Reply with quote

To add a pic:

First, upload the pic to some other site on the net. Free picture sites seem like a likely target. I have my own website, so I use that.

Secondly, include the following code in your message

[*img]http://www.someplace.com/xxxxx.jpg[/*img]

Remove the asterisks * from the line of code.

Where the data between the [img] and [/img] is the url of your pic.

HTH
Z

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Zenith49
West Park, FL
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Cory



Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 36
Location: Southeast Texas
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 4:49 pm Reply with quote

THANX !!!!!!!!!

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Hello kidz !!! I am new to raising peafowl, I have been around agriculture all my life and always desired to raise Peafowl. I am just moving back from the Upper East Side of NYC and am ready to get back to what I love! AGRICULTURE!
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featherhead
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Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 869
Location: Louisville KY
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 7:08 pm Reply with quote

Ooooh Zenith, what a great chick-shot! I know what you mean about all the chicks looking alike. I have a pair of 4-yr-old hens from the same clutch, same parents. They are identical. Four years, and I still can't tell Thelma and Louise apart!

Wish I could enlighten you on the wing issues, but I'm stumped. It's never happened to here, and I hesitate to answer questions about things I haven't experienced personally. I'll bet DCT can help. She's one of the experts.

The vitamin/electrolyte water is probably fine. I didn't use it until the kids were 4 weeks old, and then only for 5 days per month. I never give my birds water directly from the tap. I let it sit in gallon jugs for a day or two so some of the chemicals can evaporate. Chlorine, etc. Every area's water supply is a bit different; yours might not have as much chlorine.

The more space the kids have, the happier they will be. Close confinement is conducive to boredom, and the grooming will become pecking and bullying. My last batch of hen-raised chicks were in a 5' square enclosure (in their barn) until the chicks were about 4 weeks. They were getting too big and frisky for the space, so I opened the door and gave the mom and 5 babies the whole 12'x16' barn. They lived in there (wood floor) until they were 4 months old and had been wormed and etc. That method had produced the healthiest chicks ever. From another hen, I had 5 chicks to sell when they were 4 months old. I sent photos to an interested well-known breeder, and he swore they were 6 months old. He said they were too big and healthy to be only 4 months, but I was there when they hatched so I knew. He said the same thing when he saw the birds and bought them. And then he told me if I ever had any more chicks to sell, to please call him first. That was absolutely the finest compliment I think I've ever received.

The outdoor dog kennel sounds like a good idea when the chicks are old enough to live without heat. If you reinforce with chicken wire, put the wire on the inside of the kennel. That way, if a critter wants to reach for a peachick snack, the chicken wire will push the chick away from the predator. If you want to get double-security, reinforce the kennel with 1" square welded wire. And pray you don't have any skinny snakes around, because I've heard some can get thru that. I know what you mean about having the fattest squirrels in the neighborhood! Ditto.

Cory, we'd LOVE to see some of your photos. You and Zenith make me want chicks again. Unfortunately, I just don't have the time right now. But you both bring back some GREAT memories as we all learn about these amazing birds!

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Cory



Joined: 16 Feb 2012
Posts: 36
Location: Southeast Texas
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 7:14 pm Reply with quote

Awesome advice Smile) I'm doing my best to get them uploaded ..... I have to decrease the size for them to work w/ photobuckets Smile).

I'm working on them as I type Smile

Cory

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Hello kidz !!! I am new to raising peafowl, I have been around agriculture all my life and always desired to raise Peafowl. I am just moving back from the Upper East Side of NYC and am ready to get back to what I love! AGRICULTURE!
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Zenith49



Joined: 14 May 2010
Posts: 42
Location: West Park, FL
PostPosted: Mon May 14, 2012 10:17 pm Reply with quote

This evening I decided that not being able to tell them apart was a bad idea, so I used some double sided velcro and cut it into very narrow strips. I cut some white tyvek into a narrow strip as well. I put a number on the tyvek, taped it into a loop and put the velcro (fuzzy side to the inside) through the hole and attached one to each chick's right leg. Now, they are numbered 1 through 5. 1 through 4 are random, but number 5 is the youngest and smallest.

Now I'll be able to monitor their eating better.

I had no idea they would be so messy, though. I have to change the paper in the bottom every day and I'm thinking that's not often enough.

They are adorable little poop factories. And they have a strange reaction to kissy sounds.

Thanks,
Z

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Zenith49
West Park, FL
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featherhead
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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 6:35 am Reply with quote

Zenith, your photos are fabulous. The UPA always has a Chick Mania issue featuring various color chicks. Would you consider submitting a couple of photos? A lot of people will put their chicks in a "setting" of solid color to highlight the chick's pattern and color. I'm sure they would love to have your photos, and you will receive photo credit in the magazine.

For temporary baby chick tagging, some people use colored zip ties. Don't use red, though, as it will encourage pecking at the zip tie.

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Arbor



Joined: 14 Feb 2011
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Location: Niagara Canada
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2012 9:00 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
3) Keep peachicks off the ground until they are 4 months old. Around this time, their immune system will become fully developed and they can handle most of the natural germs and bacteria they are likely to ingest. Heat is essential until this time.

5) I began worming my chicks at 4 weeks. Many people start at 2 weeks.


Sorry featherhead, I'm just wondering on the above points. I am no expert either, but I am just curious. If you are keeping peachicks off the ground until 4 months, why are you worming at 4 weeks? Are they kept with other peafowl or birds? In the 20 years I've kept peafowl, I have only recently started to worm my adult birds (within the last 2 years) when I started to increase my flock numbers. I had lost a bird that I had brought in from a guy, and it turned out to be worms, my first case. I still won't worm my young birds until the spring after they hatch, as most are kept inside my barn until then. It helps me to keep track when I do medicate them, as I only do it twice per year - spring and fall.
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Peachick Grammie
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 4:24 pm Reply with quote

My chicks are raised on the ground, by their moms but the ground is clean white playground sand. They also start eating greens at about a week old because their mom shares it with them. I sit in the coop and tear into little pieces turnip greens or collard greens and they gobble them up.

I had one of my chicks at the vet today because of a wound on his shoulder probably from his father. While there, she checked poop and there was coccidia present. Glad they are on medicated chick starter but also going to put sulfa in their water for the next 6 days and will recheck poop two weeks after that.

I had been putting poult-pak vitamins in their water up until now.

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lhROW
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2012 6:54 pm Reply with quote

Quote:
Sorry featherhead, I'm just wondering on the above points. I am no expert either, but I am just curious. If you are keeping peachicks off the ground until 4 months, why are you worming at 4 weeks? Are they kept with other peafowl or birds? In the 20 years I've kept peafowl, I have only recently started to worm my adult birds (within the last 2 years) when I started to increase my flock numbers. I had lost a bird that I had brought in from a guy, and it turned out to be worms, my first case. I still won't worm my young birds until the spring after they hatch, as most are kept inside my barn until then. It helps me to keep track when I do medicate them, as I only do it twice per year - spring and fall.


I am pretty unclear at the worming stuff myself, still being pretty new at all this. I've been wondering if the prevalence (and kinds) of worms might be different depending on where you live? I'm thinking maybe the wetter and warmer places have more worm problems than where the winters get really cold? And it might be that heavy bird populations (or when birds come in from other places) could affect it?

I'd be interested to hear more from some of the folks that have been dealing with this... I'm not sure what I need to be doing, or if I need to be worried about it right now?

Thanks!

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