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  artifical day light
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  Post new topic   Reply to topic The United Peafowl Association - www.peafowl.org Forum Index » Breeding and Genetics     
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Kenneth



Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 4
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 3:42 pm Reply with quote

does anybody put lights on thier peafowl to make them lay a little earlier? the same way people do chickens? I'm new to peafowl, I just bought a pair of breeders a few days ago and I'm extremely anxious.

Thanks
Kenneth Flippen
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bcraft



Joined: 09 Nov 2007
Posts: 335
Location: Ohio
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 3:59 pm Reply with quote

Kenneth., I never use lights to get peafowl laying early. The males have to grow their trains in,they also will start to loss them after the longest day of the year. Have had hens lay after the males have dropped their train,but the eggs dont hatch.

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Kenneth



Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 4
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 8:47 pm Reply with quote

I have two pens the only thing between them is welded wire one has game chickens the other side my peafowl. my chickens have lights to make them lay do I need to hang something up to block the light? as I said I am very new to this any and all help is appreciated greatly.

Thanks
Kenneth
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sctcat
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Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 98
Location: Maryville TN
PostPosted: Sat Dec 29, 2007 9:29 pm Reply with quote

I gotta comment on this one because I screwed up my oldest male for 2 seasons by using artificial light in the pens over a winter. I was very new to this business and, because I need sunlight to function better, I decided my peafowl needed more sunlight during the darker winter days and I would turn on a regular lightbulb in their shelter area during the days and turn it off at night. My peacock grew his tail out WAY TOO EARLY that spring and, naturally, dropped it WAY TOO SOON because he had put in his courtin' time. He was still slightly off schedule the following year, too: interesting in mating when the peahens weren't and through with courting and mating while they were still in the breeding mode! It's that exposure to light that triggers the growth of those tail feathers and the onset of interest in courting. My advice? See if you can block out that light exposure to your peas!!!
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featherhead
UPA Forum Moderator
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Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 869
Location: Louisville KY
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 8:34 am Reply with quote

Wow, that's some fascinating information. I'd always wondered if artificial light would be beneficial to the peas, but obviously not!

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Kenneth



Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 4
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:30 pm Reply with quote

thanks for the help I'm glad I ask the lights are off on the chickens till I can do something about it. SCTCAT I see your only a few hours from me what colors do you have? My male is white eyed india blue and my hen is a india blue pied(don't hold me to that as I'm lost on the color thing)

thanks
Kenneth
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sctcat
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Joined: 11 Nov 2007
Posts: 98
Location: Maryville TN
PostPosted: Sun Dec 30, 2007 3:47 pm Reply with quote

I started out with a pair of IB hens and an IB cock. The coyotes got my cock and I replaced him with a pied IB. I added some whites. I added a pair of purple black shoulders. After my first UPA convention and I saw all the different colors, I went CRAZY!! In 2006, I added a pair of midnight BS, a pair of silver pieds, and a pair of opals. I drove to Nashville to get a pair of bronze but the seller informed me, upon arrival, that what he had for the price was IB split to bronze. So I'm hoping to get bronzes out of this pair in 2008. As you can see, I'm not living up to the recommended number of hens per cock, but I LOVE the colors I've got and I enjoy my birds and I'm introducing peafowl to lots of people in this area by selling chicks and spreading the word and sharing what I know whenever I get questions. I've learned everything from scratch and lots of UPA help.
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Kenneth



Joined: 29 Dec 2007
Posts: 4
PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 7:31 pm Reply with quote

(being that I'm just learning) why don't the hen come around with the cock as far as mating with the use of light? what triggers the mating cycle of both the cock and hen? he starts loosing his train after the longest day of the year right? according to this site http://goldenplains.colostate.edu/light_and_egg_production.html
that would be in july so could you not run 14-15 hours of day light once you start until the longest day of the year so the days don't seem shorter to him after you stop using lights so he would keep his train(on chickens most people stop after there is enough natural light and most give more artifical light than required so the days are shorter to the fowl when the lights are cut off). just a thought ,I have no clue about peafowl and want to learn as much as I can. hope everyone that reads this understands what I'm asking if not I'll try to explain it a better

Kenneth
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jnelson
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Joined: 20 Nov 2007
Posts: 11
Location: Florida
PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 9:57 am Reply with quote

Hi Kenneth,
It sounds like you have a great topic for research!! I dont think your going to find the answers you are looking for. I dont beleive the variables have ever been singled out and tested, so we are relying on speculation. I agree with you, if the cock responds to artificial light and begins courting, then the hen should respond the same way, idealy. However, I think daylight is not the only variable involved with breeding. Here in Florida we have had peafowl totally stop breeding as early as late June, where as the previous year they bred until late August. This has also occured with the start of breeding season. Two years ago our first batch of eggs (meaning 10 or more hens laying eggs), was not layed until April, where as in 2007 they were layed in late February. So, what accounts for the 6 week difference in our breeding season? It remains a mystery to us. Our advice would be to not use the artificial light. If your purpose is to find some answers to your quesitons, then please use the light, collect the data, and share your knowledge with the rest of us. However, if you are counting on hatching some eggs it would be best if you relied on mother nature!

Josh Nelson
Rocking B-A-B Ranch
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