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  Oyster shell and grit
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LAB



Joined: 10 Sep 2013
Posts: 9
PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 12:51 pm Reply with quote

Do peafowl need oyster shell or grit?
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burdgurl
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 1:55 pm Reply with quote

I put oyster shell out for my birds about a month before and all during the breeding season.
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D C T
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Joined: 16 Nov 2007
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Location: Georgia, USA
PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:12 pm Reply with quote

Calcium from oystershell is needed for making eggshells but also plays a part in bone
growth. This mineral has another important function often forgotten--muscle contraction
in skeletal muscles and the heart. Calcium is usually added to chick starter and layer
feed.

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burdgurl
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:29 pm Reply with quote

D C T wrote:
Calcium from oystershell is needed for making eggshells but also plays a part in bone
growth. This mineral has another important function often forgotten--muscle contraction
in skeletal muscles and the heart. Calcium is usually added to chick starter and layer
feed.


Very good point , thanks ! Even though we don't leave it for our birds all year round but do lime the pens periodically which also serves as a source of calcium.
Also
per the grit, it's needed at all times to aid in the digestion process....we have lots of small rocks that serve that pupose here though. giggle
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D C T
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 8:59 pm Reply with quote

but I forgot to answer the part about grit Embarassed
Here in East Georgia there is plenty of sand in the soil that serves well in the gizzard
as grit. But in some places grit needs to be supplied.
----------
My peachicks in mini-coops on posts that keep them off the soil are still eating
chick starter crumbles fine enough to not need grit.

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Indigo
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 10:56 am Reply with quote

I know this has nothing to do with grit but is it ok to feed pumpkin seeds to peafowl? I heard its a good wormer and a nice treat. Just wondering since so many pumpkins are about to be carved.
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D C T
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Joined: 16 Nov 2007
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Location: Georgia, USA
PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2013 2:00 pm Reply with quote

Since pumpkin seeds are eaten by people as a health food I can see no reason to fear
feeding some to the peafowls as long as they are clean and free of mold or mildew.
I never heard of it being used as a wormer.
But there was a weed called Jerusalem weed or Jerusalem oak (no relation to oak)
that an elderly aunt told me was used by my grandmother to worm her own children.
This was at a time when children in the south were infested with hookworms.
This weed grows on my property and I do give some to peachicks but do not depend on it.
Then there is chickory which grows wild in norhtern states but locally is planted and used
as a wormer for goats. I like to eat it and so do my birds when they are lucky enough to
get some.

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sashasuman



Joined: 10 Dec 2014
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 1:33 am Reply with quote

I realy wanted a mature hens for my peacock and was so frightened about getting a young one - but that was all that was available. I thought he may try and mate with her and hurt her. He was three and she was about 6 months. He fanned at her all summer - and got pretty desperate about things, but he never jumped on her...did he know she was too young? other people will help you on this question more than i can.

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D C T
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 22, 2014 9:47 am Reply with quote

Peacock/peahen relationships are different in each case. They can be good, bad or just
indifferent. It is wise to provide hiding places in case of violence. This is MUCH easier than
stitching skin and if things work out well the peahen can hide her eggs there.

If I see a peacock determined to kill a peahen I will put them in separate pens as soon as
possible (or sooner). I HATE the smell of blood on feathers Exclamation

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