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  Failing peachick
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Peachick Grammie
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Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 396
Location: Abita Springs, LA
PostPosted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 3:38 pm Reply with quote

For 6 years I have been letting my peahens hatch the peachicks and yes they are on the ground. We have had an extraordinary amount of rain this year...10 days in a row. One of the chicks had wing droop and I immediately started treating it for worms with safe guard for goats. I was giving it direct dose and set up water dosing for the other birds. This chick was one of 5 and that was more than this hen had handled before. I was finding her off the roost at night and getting everyone back and tucked in. I noticed that he was constantly standing under her like he was cold so I took him in and kept him under heat lamp. I was feeding him egg yolk and also meal worms. I would take him outside to be with the hen but it was obvious he was getting weaker. I went out at midnight to put him under the hen but came back out to check within 15-20 minutes and he was on the ground. Brought him in again but he died during the night.

So now another chick from my other hen is exhibiting this same depressed look. This is the 3-4 day of safeguard in the water. I caught the chick this morning and gave him a dose of ivermectin orally. I don't know what else to do. He does not have any symptoms other than this failure to thrive.

In 6 years I have only lost one other chick and now I'm afraid of losing a third. I see zero signs of coccidia and they are on medicated chick started. They also eat some kind of greens every day. I give them 3 grain scratch once or twice a week to supplement their feed. My vet said I cannot give them Solumet and safeguard at the same time.

What else can I do???

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Peachick Grammie
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casportpony



Joined: 11 Sep 2009
Posts: 29
Location: Gilroy, CA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 10:51 am Reply with quote

If it were mine I would weigh it and treat for coccidiosis with Corid and I'd also treat for blackhead with metronidazole at no less than 30mg/kg once a day. I'd also give it an oral dose of Corid at 20mg/kg.

Corid dose per gallon:

The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid Powder is 1.5 teaspoons
The severe outbreak dose (.024%) for Corid liquid is 2 teaspoon.


The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid Powder is 3/4 teaspoon.
The moderate outbreak dose (.012%) for Corid liquid is 1 teaspoon.

The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid Powder is 1/3 teaspoon.
The preventative dose (.006%) for Corid liquid is 1/2 teaspoon.

More Corid info here:
http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/818879/updated-corid-and-amprol-amprolium-dosing
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D C T
UPA Forum Moderator
UPA Forum Moderator


Joined: 16 Nov 2007
Posts: 897
Location: Georgia, USA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 11:50 am Reply with quote

I learned the hard way that having a perch for a mother peahen with peachicks can be a
bad idea. A peahen may accidentally land on a peachick when coming off the perch.
Newly hatched peachicks have not yet had time to have worms. They have to eat worm
eggs and form worms.
Last year I had a peahen mother with three babies. One of those died and when I gave
Safe-Guard to the others they died. You may be able to find my post about that.
This year, so far, I have NO peachicks but there is a peahen setting and another thinking
about it. Also this year I have a shortage of setting chickens.
----------
But when I do have peachicks they are fed chick starter medicated with Amprolium
for Coccidiosis.

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casportpony



Joined: 11 Sep 2009
Posts: 29
Location: Gilroy, CA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 1:09 pm Reply with quote

I agree that they're probably too young to have worms, but they are *not* to young to have blackhead as they can get that by something called "cloacal drinking". Lost two *very* young ones to blackhead in 2012 and blackhead was confirmed by necropsies at UC Davis. The rest of the clutch I managed to save by treating with metronidazole 30mg/kg orally and Safeguard 50mg/kg orally. The Safeguard dose wasn't needed, but I gave it to them anyway. At the time I think they weighed about 100 grams and were given .05ml by mouth and again in 10 days.

This illness could also be a bacterial infection. Perhaps taking a fecal to the vet and having it checked would be best? My vet charges about $30 to do a gram stain.

-Kathy
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casportpony



Joined: 11 Sep 2009
Posts: 29
Location: Gilroy, CA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 14, 2014 1:54 pm Reply with quote

Just thought I should comment on ivermectin doses... The highest properly documented dose I have seen published is .4mg/kg, but most published info suggests .2mg/kg. With the 1% ivermectin the .2mg/kg dose is .02ml/kg (.02 ml per 2.2 pounds), so the dose for a 100gram chick would be .002ml. With small fowl one could very easily give a lethal dose.

-Kathy
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