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  Cyst removal process (w/ link to pictures)
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connerhills
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Joined: 31 Oct 2007
Posts: 383
Location: Mo.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 8:57 am Reply with quote

Omar, to me ,I med. with tylan 200 as soon as I notice ithe swelling.. many times this does not help as it goes fast. After that I may give more meds, but to get it hard just takes time for the system to take most of the moisture out of it and then it gets hard and will look like the blob that it is. Many time the size is not a judge of what the condition is so the bird needs to be handled and observed , times are it is left longer than necessary. connerhills
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RunDanRun
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
Posts: 121
Location: Springfield/Willard, Missouri
PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2012 10:40 am Reply with quote

I thinking George might respond to this as well, but from my experience, time (as in waiting four to six weeks or so) was the thing that made the cyst hard. The reason I waited that long was because I was treating it with other medications, but having no luck . . . and then it took a couple of weeks until I could get the bird out to George's place where we cut the now hardened lump out. I'm not sure what causes the lump to turn from gooey infection to a hard cyst that can be cut out, but I think (guessing here), just like an infection in our bodies, finally the white blood cells "win" the battle with the infection, BUT the "dead" cyst remains like an inert mass that requires "surgery" to remove (cutting it out).

Others may have a better medical understanding of this process, but that what I would guess happens and why there's little you can do (if you're wanting a hardened cyst to remove) but wait...it's a gross analogy, but it is possibly like waiting for a pimple to form (only on a larger scale).
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DXBPete



Joined: 31 Jan 2013
Posts: 12
Location: Dubai, UAE
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 4:07 am Reply with quote

Our new peahen suffered from this as well. We took her to the vet yesterday and he made the incision as described earlier in this thread. The cyst hadn't hardened so he used an instrument to scrape out as much as he could. Total mass was comparable to the images of the hardened ones. The vet used a powder antibiotic in and around the incision and instructed us to apply Baneocin around the infected area for a few days until we return. This morning we applied the medicine. With this treatment the vet told us the cyst will harden by the time we return so he'll be able to remove it completely.

The vet has seen cases like this and asked if we had changed the food recently. We have. We started mixing our own grains and added corn. The vet says the unground corn is probably what caused the cyst after becoming lodged at the back of mouth.

Here is a picture from today. http://i1336.photobucket.com/albums/o660/dxbpete/eyeinfection_zpsfe8a537e.jpg
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RunDanRun
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
Posts: 121
Location: Springfield/Willard, Missouri
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 9:03 am Reply with quote

Not to argue with a vet, but I'm not sure it's the fault of the whole corn -- I feed all my peacocks a mix of whole corn, layer and dry cat food (along with a mix of other items in small quantity). I've only had the eye cyst problem once in any of my peafowl (which we documented in this post). I am not a vet, but maybe it had more to do with the change of diet than just the whole corn?
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DXBPete



Joined: 31 Jan 2013
Posts: 12
Location: Dubai, UAE
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 12:11 pm Reply with quote

I read an article more than a year ago about something similar in a child.

• Emma Whittington, of Hutchinson, Kan., rushed her daughter to the ER in December when the girl, seven months old, developed a golf-ball-sized lump on her neck. Two days later, at a hospital in Wichita, a doctor gently pulled a feather out of the lump and hypothesized that it had been in the midst of emerging from her throat. Doctors said the girl probably swallowed the feather accidentally, that it got stuck in throat tissue, and that her body was trying to eject it through the skin.

To me, it seems more logical than a simple change in diet causing infections of this type repeatedly next to the mouth. A change in diet that causes cysts would cause them on other parts of the body. I could also be wrong. Smile
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RunDanRun
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Joined: 14 Dec 2009
Posts: 121
Location: Springfield/Willard, Missouri
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 12:27 pm Reply with quote

Could be. Just seems odd that a piece of corn at the back of the throat would cause a cyst in the eye socket rather than, well, the back of the throat/neck area. Of course, it still could be just that. But now I'm wondering how, with the amount of gravel and other "rough edged" items peafowl eat and swallow, does a piece of food become "lodged" when it would seem with all the other stuff they're swallowing, it would either become dislodged or become a "dam" of sorts and not allow other items to pass after a time? Yeah, just questions that I really don't know the answers to. Smile
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DXBPete



Joined: 31 Jan 2013
Posts: 12
Location: Dubai, UAE
PostPosted: Fri Mar 01, 2013 1:19 pm Reply with quote

The vet was looking into her mouth. I'm not that comfortable handling the peafowl to do this myself. It'll be interesting to see if someone reading this thread with a cooperative patient can check the rear of the beak on the side of a similar cyst sees any abnormalities not seen on the good side.
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CameraChick



Joined: 11 Jun 2013
Posts: 45
Location: Hershey/Harrisburg, PA
PostPosted: Tue Jun 25, 2013 6:24 pm Reply with quote

Gentlemen, thank you SO much for the tutorial. Thanks to you (and a really, really graphic and terribly shot YouTube video), we were able to do the same for Peabody this evening. He was a model patient, and seems to be doing quite well. The cyst just "popped" out once the incision was made....and since our nurse practitioner friend was helping us, we got curious and cut the cyst open after making sure Peabody was settled back in his temporary pen.

We couldn't find any foreign matter that the cyst may have formed around. It seemed somewhat spongy, and as gross as this is, our theory was that, at least with this particular peacock, the infection started with sinusitis and then formed the cyst...it was a consistent yellow color all the way through, and the only "blood" was that of the surrounding tissue. Don't know if that's the case in every bird, but that's what it was in ours.

Oddly, she offered to help us again, should anyone need it. She LIKED doing that, although she waits to approach the bird until its well restrained...she's not a fan of "flapping wings and gnashing beaks." Smile

So, now....observation and antibiotics for a week or two, and then they can finally go back to being free range birds!
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Adirondack Ed



Joined: 04 Nov 2013
Posts: 19
Location: Northern New York State
PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 8:38 pm Reply with quote

I have my peafowl free ranged but I give them some treats each day in order to get a close look at each of them in case anything bad is happening. Last Wednesday I noticed that my one year old male had his right eye swollen shut and was shaking his head so I thought that he had a sinus infection but started putting safe guard in their water just in case it was capilaria. I also put tylan 50 in the water but I know that would be very weak so I went online and ordered tylan200 injectable. It arrived in two days but being that the birds are free ranged there was no way to catch him to inject the Tylan200. I then thought that I would just feed small bread treats to each peafowl and when it was the male with the swollen eye's turn I used the syringe to soak the bread crumb and tossed it to this male. Within a few minutes I had him eat bread crumbs containing two MLs of Tylan200. Within 24 hours his eye reopened and within 48 hours his eye has cleared and he shakes his head only sporadically. I will continue to give him the Tylan200 bread crumbs for a couple of more days until I am sure he is on the mend but right now he is acting great and just the way he has always acted. This process was very simple for me to get the Tylan200 into him and still have it work in a very short time.
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burdgurl
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Joined: 07 Apr 2008
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PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 8:46 pm Reply with quote

Adirondack Ed wrote:
I have my peafowl free ranged but I give them some treats each day in order to get a close look at each of them in case anything bad is happening. Last Wednesday I noticed that my one year old male had his right eye swollen shut and was shaking his head so I thought that he had a sinus infection but started putting safe guard in their water just in case it was capilaria. I also put tylan 50 in the water but I know that would be very weak so I went online and ordered tylan200 injectable. It arrived in two days but being that the birds are free ranged there was no way to catch him to inject the Tylan200. I then thought that I would just feed small bread treats to each peafowl and when it was the male with the swollen eye's turn I used the syringe to soak the bread crumb and tossed it to this male. Within a few minutes I had him eat bread crumbs containing two MLs of Tylan200. Within 24 hours his eye reopened and within 48 hours his eye has cleared and he shakes his head only sporadically. I will continue to give him the Tylan200 bread crumbs for a couple of more days until I am sure he is on the mend but right now he is acting great and just the way he has always acted. This process was very simple for me to get the Tylan200 into him and still have it work in a very short time.


That's exactly how I medicate my birds, thank you for posting the info for others !
Personally if I were you I would treat all the birds, if it's mycoplasma g. it's contagious.
Hope he continues to do well !
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Adirondack Ed



Joined: 04 Nov 2013
Posts: 19
Location: Northern New York State
PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2014 8:59 pm Reply with quote

burdgurl, I agree with keeping an eye on the others as the daily treats keep them coming right up next to me so I can get a good look at each one of them. However with over fifty years of raising chickens and turkeys but being new to peafowl I am in the group of medicating only when needed so I will keep on medicating him and keep an eye on the others. As they daily mingle with chickens and turkeys I would think the CRD originated with one of the chickens so I will also keep an ear open at night in the chicken house for any sounds of CRD. It has been a tough winter here in the North Country so I am surprised there is not more bad things going on than there is. I also aagree with you that medicating the bread crumbs is a simple way to get it into a birds system.
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Adirondack Ed



Joined: 04 Nov 2013
Posts: 19
Location: Northern New York State
PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 3:53 pm Reply with quote

After four days of giving my one year old male 2mls of tylan200 by injecting it into bread crumbs and feeding it to him he appears to have no sign of a sinus infection. He came right up to me yesterday and I was able to get a very good look at his eye and it is now normal. He no longer is shaking his head in any manner so it appears to me that feeding meds via treats is another way to get the meds in them, especially free ranged birds. I was also able to get a close up look at the other males and females and they all look to be in fine shape with no sign of an infecton. By placing the meds into the bread crumbs I was able to medicate only this one male and did not have to be concerned with any of the free ranged egg laying chickens getting into any medicated water. Hope this helps anyone who is looking for an alternative to breast injection or liquid in the throat.
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